CERAMICS

Our lab is especially dedicated to the conservation of objects made of ceramic or glass, including terra-cotta, earthenware, stoneware, porcelain, and enamel. In our studio we practice treatments which alleviate all types of deterioration caused by environmental factors, mishandling, previous improper restorations or changes in chemical components of the objects.

We perform treatments including different types of cleaning; reduction of surface dirt, grime, accretions, or stains; removal/reduction of non-original coatings or restorations; consolidation, desalination as well as structural treatments including removal of deteriorated previous structural repairs, structural fills, joining, etc. Considering the level of aesthetic reintegration is an important final step in any ceramic treatment. Reintegration can include creation of fills to compensate losses, inpainting of such fills, and finishing of the surface. Matching restorations to better integrate them with the surrounding pieces can involve the toning, texturizing, and painting of such fills. Treatments often aim to improve the viewer’s interpretation of an object. Reintegration should, however, be carried out to the minimum degree needed, with sufficient evidence to support the restorations. As with all conservation treatments, aesthetic reintegration should be fully documented, particularly so that original materials may be distinguished from the restorations. All materials used at our studio in the process of ceramics conservation are as durable, but also as reversible as possible. Below, you will find selected examples of our ceramics conservation projects.

Our Work

Etruscan Pottery. Thin-walled Bucchero. 7th century BC.

On left: Before conservation.

On right: After conservation.

FullSizeRender (28)
FullSizeRender (29)

Etruscan Pottery. Impasto kyathos. 7th century BC.

1st Row: Before conservation.

2nd Row: After conservation.

FullSizeRender (15)
FullSizeRender (16)
IMG_0906
FullSizeRender (17)

Etruscan Pottery. Impasto kyathos. 7th century BC.

1st Row: Before conservation.

2nd Row: After conservation.

1C4D6684-11F7-4149-88A4-71CA952E3EDD
7D7BFD6C-9253-462C-925D-E048229FF7A1

Apulian Pottery. Red owl skyphos. 5th century BC.

On left: Before conservation

In middle and right: After conservation

FullSizeRender (21)
image2
image1

Majolica Vase.

1st Row: Before conservation.

2nd Row: After conservation.

FullSizeRender (27)
FullSizeRender (55)

Daunian Pottery. 5th century BC.

1st Row: Before conservation.

2nd Row: After conservation.

FullSizeRender (30)
IMG_0109
FullSizeRender (32)
IMG_0925 (1)

Etruscan Pottery. 6th century BC.

1st Row and 2nd row: Before and during conservation.

3rd Row: After conservation.

FullSizeRender (34)
FullSizeRender (33)
IMG_0597
IMG_3815
FullSizeRender (35)
image1 (1)

Etruscan Pottery. Thin-walled Bucchero. 7th century BC.

On left: Before conservation.

On right: After conservation.

FullSizeRender (36)
FullSizeRender (37)

Duanian Pottery. Kyathos. 5th century BC.

On left: Before conservation.

In middle and right: After conservation.

Daunian Pottery. Kyathos. 5th century BC.

On left: Before conservation.

On right: After conservation.

E57693C3-520B-4988-92EF-DEAF59E90773
29D3D4DC-4A62-4EAA-A9A7-530552C4A520